I’m guilty too

I promised yesterday that some amazing interviews were coming soon.  And, it’s true.  I just got the pleasure of interviewing Kaylie Wallace of Mulberry Market Designs.  See her Etsy shop here and her website here.

Kaylie is the mother of two, who took leftover décor from her DIY backyard wedding back in 2012 and turned it into a successful business.  She was able to quit her corporate job after three months, and he husband joined their business full-time after one year.  How wonderful!  I love hearing stories about successful businesses just like this one.

Kaylie provided so much inspiration during our interview, and she also said something that really resonated with me.  When I asked her if she had any regrets as far as how motherhood and her creative work intersect, this is what she had to say:

The only regret I feel often is not disconnecting when I should. I love to play with my children and make time for them each day. Sometimes I find my mind drifting about work, or even checking things often on my phone. I would like to get better about shutting things off and being in the present when I am with them. 

Yep, I’m guilty of that too.  Sometimes I notice my mind wandering off when I’m playing something quiet with my kids, like building with blocks.  I’ll find myself thinking, “Oh, I need to change out the laundry” or “I need to reply to that email.”  I, too, need to disconnect and enjoy the moment.

Thank you, Kaylie, for that great reminder.  And, thank you for an awesome interview.  I look forward to sharing more from Kaylie’s interview in the book.

The road to hell is paved with good intentions

When I first started writing this book and blogging about it, I intended to write about every single mother that I contacted, whether she contributed to the book or not.  I was encountering so many great moms out there, and I wanted to bring attention to each and every one of them, whether they were interested in being a part of my book or not.  Well, intentions are great, but they don’t always come to fruition.

I did a good job in the beginning.  I contacted one or two women every day and blogged about each of them, linking to their websites, etc.  If I’m going to finish this book… ever, I’m going to have to move.  Slow and steady wins the race, but I needed to put a little pep in my step, so that’s what I did.  Don’t get me wrong, I’m still move extremely slow and steady.

I’m still working every single day on the book, with the exception of a few days that were fun-filled family days.  I was so devastated the first day that I missed a day.  I was so busy having a great time with my family that I completely spaced working on the book.  I didn’t even realize it until the next day!  That feeling of disappointment didn’t last too long.  Family first!

Now that I’ve picked up the pace, I’m obviously researching and emailing more and (unfortunately) blogging less.  I wish I had more time to dedicate to all aspects of this book, because I truly love them all.  But, such is (mommy) life.

Of the moms I contacted yesterday, the last five have agreed to interviews.  And, I want to share a little about them today.

  • Kaylie of Mulberry Market Design – Kaylie and her husband, Josh, make hand-lettered signs, wedding décor and home décor in Plant City, Florida.  See their Etsy shop here.  See their website to view their entire line of wedding décor, home décor and calligraphy services.
  • Amy of Inviting Moments – Amy makes wedding invitations, family trees and chalkboard art and sells them in her Etsy store.  She’s a wife and mother of three.
  • Allison of Epically Epic Soap – Allison crafts colorful and creative soaps, lotions, lip balms, and gifts in Sante Fe, New Mexico.  You can see her Etsy shop here.  Read about her transition from art gallery director and painter to soap maker.
  • Tessa of Amos and Sawyer – You simply must read her story!  Tessa makes adorable newborn, infant and toddler photography props and accessories in Rogersville, Tennessee.  See her Etsy shop here.
  • Chelsie of Printable Candee  – Chelsie creates precious invitations and printables and sells them in her Etsy shop.  She’s from Seattle, Washington, and the mother of two toddlers.

These are just a few of the interviews you can look forward to in the coming days.  I’m looking forward to visiting with each on of them.

I intend to do better about blogging in the future, but you know what they say about intentions…

It’s been awhile…

And there’s no excuse for that.  But, here’s mine anyway… Since I vowed back in December to work every single day on the book, I really have been trucking right along.  I’ve been contacting women on Etsy for the past month or so.  I’ve been visiting Etsy shops and doing research and sending out emails requesting interviews.  Yeah, sounds rough.  Looking at cute Etsy shops all day.  And by all day, I mean the tiny sliver of time that I dedicate to work every afternoon (if the planets align).  But, I’ve managed alright.  😉

I have to tell you, I sure felt silly that I hadn’t even considered Etsy until I inadvertently stumbled across a list of the top Etsy sellers.  Big surprise, a lot of them are moms.  There sure are a lot of creative mamas there, and I have been getting some great responses.

One such mama is Susan Shaprio.  Her Etsy shop is Susabellas, and she has her own online shop at www.susabella.com.  Susan is the maker and seller of personalized wedding, baby and home gifts.  She has had 37,340 sales on Etsy alone since 2011!  She started her business in her garage at her home in Woodinville, Washington, but has since outgrown that space and now operates out of a 1,900 square foot studio/warehouse.  Susan sums up her experience in a few short sentences:

I moved to Seattle in 2004 and eventually met my husband and when we had our son I decide to take some time off. I missed having a creative outlet and my mother in law suggested taking pottery classes. One thing lead to another and my hobby became a business.

Although, I’m sure there’s a little more to it, that brief story is so inspirational.  It makes me think, “I can do that.” And, you can too!  That’s what the whole book is about–moms inspiring other moms and making us all realize we can do it.

Susan ended our interview with some words of encouragement:

If you are passionate about something and want to turn your hobby into a business, you can do it! Don’t put it off or make excuses. Create a list or quick business plan to help you get started and get to it! Sales always take awhile but persistence and hard work pay off. Don’t be afraid to ask for help or advice, I still do all the time.

Like Susan, you too can turn a hobby into a business with a little hard work and persistence.  Susan’s entire interview will be one of many featured in the book.  So, stay tuned!

Don’t break the chain!

How is your calendar looking?  Not to , but mine is looking awesome!  I made a commitment to myself on December 27, 2016, to do some kind of work on this book everyday.  And, I have! (Here‘s my previous post about it.)  Some days it’s researching for a few hours and some days it’s simply sending or replying to an email.  BUT, it all adds up.

There have been a few days that I get ready to go to bed and realize that the day had slipped by, and I hadn’t done one single thing for the book.  So, I lug out the ol’ laptop and get to work.  There was one day that I even thought I could skip it–just that one time.  But, I know I wouldn’t be able to look at that one square on the calendar that didn’t have a big red X.  So, after everyone was in bed, I got to work.  And, I’m so glad I did.

So, just because it’s been quiet around here, I assure you, it’s not because I’m not working.  I’m actually getting quite a bit done.  Shocker! But, now that I’m committed to work on the book everyday, I’m getting so much more done.  Yeah, I know!  Who knew?

I have some great interviews in the works.  I just visited with Erin Althea, and I’ll be posting about that soon.  She’s the mother of twins and is a props/FX designer at DreamWorks!  She also owns her own business, Love&Quarry, where she produces concrete and resin objects and accessories.  I also have a telephone interview tomorrow with Darrah from OtisB Jewelry.

So, stay tuned.  There’s lots in the works.  And, keep working everyday so you can put that big red X on your calendar.

Dejah Leger speaks on being an introvert

Earlier this week, I spoke to Dejah Leger.  You can see my previous post about her here.  She had so many great things to say in our interview, but one thing really jumped out at me.  When asked about what motivates her, this is (part of) what she had to say:

When I need to be musical, I’ll often kick my family out of the house to work on music. I send my kids and husband out of the house to watch a movie or grocery shop or something. I don’t feel guilty about it (usually). I’m an introvert, so my way of recharging my batteries is to be alone, and music is an extra level of self-centering. My family has come to terms with the fact that I’m a much better parent/partner/human being when I have that time of creative solitude, and so I’ve learned to ask for it, which isn’t always easy to do as a parent. Plus, there’s some weird phenomenon where the minute I sit down with my guitar is when my kids need my attention all of a sudden. Or want to make their own music. Loudly.

Her answer spoke to me because I, too, am an introvert.  I don’t think that extroverts understand that introverts need peace and solitude to recharge.  Extroverts get their energy from being around other people and being social.  Introverts are the opposite; we often times need time to ourselves to regain our energy.  Sorry folks, but being around people sometimes drains us.

I thought Dejah’s words were comforting in a way.  It was almost as though she was giving me permission to want and need that time to myself to create.  I don’t know about you, but I feel that I live in a world driven by and made for extroverts.  Seeking solitude and quiet is not really praised in our society.  We are supposed to be happy, social beings always, and we are looked at strangely when we need that little bit of alone time.  I feel much more comfortable at home than striking up a conversation with a stranger or at a party.  I feel that most people just don’t get that.

So, thank you to Dejah for giving us permission to and comfort in asking for that quiet time that we introverts need recharge and create!

Advice on productivity from Jerry Seinfeld

I had already heard about Jerry Seinfeld’s calendar system from Austin Kleon.  Here‘s a recent post of his about it.  But, I hadn’t read this article–Jerry Seinfeld’s Productivity Secret by Brad Isaac.  It’s such a simple concept, and it makes so much sense.  Anytime really is a good time to try a new system, but the beginning of a new year is the perfect time to implement this system.

My challenge to you:

  1.  Buy a calendar.
  2. Do work.  Everyday.
  3. Don’t break the chain.

I’m going to do it too.  I’m buying a giant wall calendar (and a red Sharpie).  Here‘s the  calendar I picked out.  Can’t wait to start making those red Xs.

How Lacey Monroe deals with disappointment

I contacted Lacey Monroe several months ago regarding an interview for the book.  Here is my previous post about her.  Just to refresh your memory, she is a fine art documentary photographer based in Portland, Oregon.  She is also the mother of two young children, ages 5 and 3.

During our interview, I asked Lacey how she deals with disappointment in her creative journey.  This is what she had to say:

I think disappointment is a totally normal and even healthy part of being an artist. You have to show up and do the work, even when it is in a creative field. I may only actually like a few photos of mine each year (if I’m lucky!) but I have to take all the ones I am unhappy with just to be able to achieve those few that I like. Being disappointed in your work, just means that you see how you can grow. If I was always satisfied with my work I would grow complacent and would stop pushing myself to grow and change as an artist. That is not to say that when disappointment hits it is not at time devastating. It absolutely can be. It is all too easy to fall into the trap of comparing yourself to others and when you get passed over for an award or gallery show, it’s hard to not get down on yourself. However, you have to recognize that as trap that will bog you down and do what you can not to let it. When I am feeling discouraged with my art, I will take a bit of break with the creative end of things and work on all the backend boring business stuff that is always on my to-do list, but so often gets pushed down farther and farther on the list because it isn’t as fun for me as creating. So if I just don’t have it in me to create, there is still a long list of things I can work on. I also make time to hang out with other creative in real life, groups online are great for support and community, but there is nothing quite like having actual face to face time with other artists to bond, grow, and, perhaps, commiserate. This can be something as simple as happy hour drinks with a local photographer or it can be more elaborate and attending a retreat or workshop away from home. I also have a running list of photography books on my wish list, so if I am feeling particularly uninspired I will treat myself to a new book so I can get lost in the work of the master photographers that I find endlessly inspiring.

She makes so many great points here.

  1. Disappointment is a necessary evil.  It’s a good way to identify ways you can improve.
  2. You do have to show up and do the work.  Just because it’s creative doesn’t mean it just magically happens.  It’s still work.
  3. It’s easy to compare yourself to others in your field but don’t do it.  Spend that time creating instead of Facebook stalking others and you will come out so much further ahead.
  4. When you aren’t feeling so creative, there’s always other work to be done.  Find something else to do that still relates to your craft, such as the not-so-fun business side of things.
  5. While online groups are great, nothing compares to actual face-to-face time with other artists.  Take the time to meet up with other artists in your area with whom you can share ideas, successes and failures.
  6. Read a book.  Always have a list of books to read.  Books pertaining to your craft can offer great inspiration.

A huge “thank you” to Lacey Monroe.  She had so much to offer.  I look forward to sharing more from her interview in the book.